Good numbers of skippies coming up on the lures

Only a couple of days last week, the weather’s getting more variable now. We went out Tuesday and had another good day with another good mix of tarakihi and snapper, and yet again, good numbers of skippies coming up on the lures. We’ve caught more of them in the last few trips than over the whole of the summer. Although the South and SWesterlies coming up will probably push them back to the tropics. Too much SW for the Saturday, but we got the Sunday in. A bit sloppier than forecasted, the wind didn’t really drop like the...

About Us

The Manutere has been taking out fishing trips out of Tauranga for the past 40 years. A purpose built charter fishing vessel with plenty of walk around fishing space, perfect for individuals or groups.

Brett Keller the owner/operator takes great pride in putting his passengers onto the fish - consistently. This is reflected by our regular customer base. The fact is, we try harder.

Whether its snapper fishing, tarakihi fishing, hapuka fishing or kingfish jigging, we can help put you on the fish. We take pride in our fishing trips and always aim to make your fishing trip and day on the water, as enjoyable as possible.

Tauranga Marine Charters and the Manutere have the fishing trip for you.

 

 

How to Find Us

Tauranga: Bridge Marina

Bridge Marina is located on the Mount side of the harbor bridge. When coming over the harbor bridge from Tauranga, take the first turn on the left. Free all day parking is available. The Manutere is berthed in D34.

If you require accommodation nearby please ask us, we can recommend Bed & Breakfasts, backpackers, campgrounds, hotels, motels and apartments to suit your needs, all within walking distance or a short drive.

If you are unsure of the location, or you need directions from your home town, please contact us we will get back to you with the directions!

Mount Maunganui: Salisbury Wharf

Salisbury Wharf is located in Pilot Bay at the Mount. If you turn left off Maunganui Road onto Salisbury Avenue you’ll go just past the information centre and Police station and you’ll see the Mount Ocean Sports Club right beside the Salisbury wharf.

Parking in Salisbury Avenue or Pilot Bay is available and free for all day parking.

If you are unsure of the location, or you need directions from your home town, please contact us we will get back to you with the directions!

Testimonials - view all

5.9.2009

Hi Brett,
 
I enjoyed my fishing during my last trip to Tauranga. The fishes caught was really delicious...Taratiki. I couldn't wait to eat them, so, I cooked a few fillets at the Bay Palm Motel where I stayed. I brought the rest back to Perth and my family just loved them.
 
Just a note that you should be aware of so that you can advise all future Australians who fish with you and want to bring the fishes home. The fishes MUST be headless, gilled and gutted. Remember, must not have heads. I decleared my fishes and the first questions asked was whether I removed the head (which I did) and since my fishes were also gutted and gilled, I could bring in ALL(including the fillets).
 
Best wishes for the season and happy fishing.

Regards,


Melvin Wee
JAS Sushi, Perth

Additional Area Information

About Mayor Island

Tuhua Island, or Mayor Island, as it was named by Captain James Cook, lies 22 nautical miles from Mount Maunganui in the Bay of Plenty.

Mayor Island was ‘discovered’ by Captain Cook on the date of the Lord Mayor’s Day in London, England - November 3rd, 1769. Obsidian, or Tuhua (which is the Maori name for the island) is a rich dark glasslike volcanic rock prevalent on the island and had a multitude of uses by the Maori. The sites of heavy fortifications testify to it’s value.

A marine reserve was created off the northern end of Mayor Island in 1993 and boasts some of the finest scuba diving and snorkelling in NZ.
Once a favourite haunt of Zane Grey and gets numerous mentions in Ray Douges books, The waters around Mayor Island hold some of the biggest snapper, kingfish and gamefish around. For that reason alone, boats that go there are usually full of happy anglers.

The water clarity (situated 26 kilometres off the Bay of Plenty Coast, Tuhua’s distance from human populations has meant relatively pollution-free waters) means a wide range of marine plants thrive and there is a great diversity of fish. These include open water migratory species, fish found throughout New Zealand waters and several sub-tropical species. The water clarity, numbers of fish and spectacular underwater scenery, make the area a popular diving spot.
Wildlife.

Visit Mayor Island and explore the biggest pohutakawa forest in the world. Take an easy walk to the biggest tree on the island, and be surrounded by so much bird life it’ll blow your mind. The island itself is a trampers paradise, with ancient tracks from the days when it was heavily populated by local Maori, winding there way through pristine Pohutakawa forest, over steep ridges offering awesome vistas of the volcanic crater lakes and the mainland in the distance.

The native birdlife populations have exploded. Norway rats, kiore (Polynesian rat) and feral cats have been eradicated from the island, which makes it predator free.

Mayor Island has had the conservation status of a wildlife refuge since 1953 and is administered by the Mayor Island Board of Trustees. It now has healthy populations of nectar-feeding bellbirds, tui, and wood pigeons. Other native birds include the fantail and morepork, the kaka (brown parrot), waxeye, grey warbler, kingfisher, pied tit and, soaring on the thermals, the harrier hawk. In summer the shining cuckoo is also seen and heard in good numbers. Many who have visited here over the years have enjoyed its peaceful solitude. There is also magnificent swimming and snorkelling to be had in the crystal clear waters of Sou’ East Bay.

North Island Robin had previously been recorded on the island however had become extinct due to pests such as rats and cats. The robin is the first species to be reintroduced to the island and took place in May 2003. 42 Robin were sourced from Mokoia Island in Lake Rotorua and released onto their new home on Tuhua.

A further fantastic find was the presence of four tomtits which provides the first record of this species for over 20 years and were thought to have died out.
Magda Willaims from the Tuhua Trust Board said, “we are not only delighted at how well the toutouwai are breeding but at the increased birdlife as a whole. We have had some wonderful stories relayed including a korimako being handfed watermelon and a photographer losing sight of a toutouwai before taking the picture and realising it had landed on her arm!”

Click here for additional information about Tuhua.

About Motiti Island

Motiti is roughly 1500 acres and has about thirty permanent residents on the northern half and six on the southern half. The island has a rich Maori heritage evidenced by pa sites and diggings. In 1850 the first European settlers bought the southern half.

In the early days, communication with the mainland was done by signal fire! This progressed to carrier pigeon, then thankfully, in 1946 the radio telephone was introduced. The year 2000 saw the first email link established.

Motiti has an abundance of natural fresh water springs. The land is fertile, the surrounding ocean boasts prolific sea life and birds thrive in the unpolluted environment. The rock fishing and diving are legendary!

The Motiti Bunkhouse sleeps 16. Four bunk rooms each sleep four and there are two sets of ablutions.

In between is a central fully equipped kitchen and dining hub. Cooking and hot water heating is by gas. There are the two refrigerators and a small chest freezer. Electricity is by generator which is on for a few hours in the evening. When the generator is off minimal lighting is provided by 12 volt battery or candlepower! Winter fishing enthusiasts can thaw out by the pot belly stove. Outside there are two barbeques, outdoor eating facilities and a shower.
A cricket pitch and tennis court are available for those energetically inclined!

Bunkhouse guests will need to bring all food and liquid refreshments (there are no shopping facilities) as well as sleeping bags, pillow cases, towels, personal items, fishing gear, bait(in buckets please!), snorkeling and dive gear (tanks and air available),warm clothing and walking shoes.
It also pays to bring a torch!

If there’s just two of you and you’d prefer a little pampering and lazing about, then our Guest Unit would suit you. With million dollar views over Home Bay, very comfortable surroundings and ALL MEALS PROVIDED - now that’s a real holiday!

Guests are welcome to relax in the garden and enjoy refreshments in Home Bay Saloon.

The fishing at Motiti is great whether off the rocks or by boat with catches including snapper, kingfish & many others.

5 to 10 minutes walk from the Bunkhouse will bring you to ‘The Beer Garden’, ‘The Plank’ and ‘Shag’s Roost’ world famous (in Motiti at least) rock fishing spots.
Ease the inflatable into the water and zip out to some of the best Snapper, Tarakihi and blue mao mao fishing grounds in the Bay of Plenty.
All within 100mtrs of the shoreline.

The diving and snorkeling at Motiti is spectacular. There’s terrain to suit beginners through to experienced divers. The tug boat, Taioma, scuttled just a few metres off Motiti is an awesome underwater sight and we have some wonderful spots for scallops, crayfish, spear-fishing and photography. Two 5 meter inflatables are available for hire as well as dive tanks and refills.

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